Slowly returning

It has been quite some time since our last post here at BikeAble, but we haven’t sat still. We’ve remained active offline helping people find the bikes, trikes, and pedalcycles of all varieties that best suit their needs.

So it is time to bring those stories back out here to the public in order for everybody to benefit, which was always the purpose of this site.

Keep an eye out, there’s more to come!

Assisted Cycling Tours « Home

Assisted Cycling Tours « Home.

This is a web site that provides cycling tours for people that have a disability and they’re families .

Assisted Cycling Tours mission statement is:

Our mission is to enhance the lives of people with disabilities and their families through providing a cycling experience which will increase their self confidence and allow the entire family to participate.

We seek to promote family, independence and well-being for all who participate.

The tours are located in Colorado.

by James S.

“A Medical Necessity” Part 2

written by James S.

Well part two of “A Medical Necessity” has been a learning experience for me to say the least. I started out with very good intentions hoping to find an easy way for all of us parents to get some help with acquiring adaptive cycles or recumbent tricycles for our children and for our disabled veterans, what ever special needs they have.  This  endeavor is going to take a little longer than a night or two from the looks of it. All that I can promise is to compile as much information as possible that will be the most beneficial  to everyone.

This is an excerpt from www.thefreelibrary.com along with a link to the complete article.

Typically, a piece of adaptive equipment is utilized to increase a child’s function. Examples of adaptive equipment or assistive technology are wheelchairs, lifts, standing frames, gait trainers,augmentative communication devices, bath chairs, and recreational items such as swings or tricycles. The process of obtaining a particular piece of equipment is defined primarily by the funding source. The funding source may be through your child’s health insurance; it may be through the child’s school system; or it could be through private funding.

My child needs a piece of adaptive equipment now what? Well, it depends!.

I have tried to find information on writing a letter of medical necessity and who is supposed to actually do the writing, us, the doctor/therapist, or both.

This is an excerpt from the article “Writing letters of medical necessity“, also from www.thefreelibrary.com.

While it is typically the duty of a medical professional to write a Letter of Medical Necessity, there are other people whose opinions can help sway those reviewing the claim. Teachers, case managers, counselors and parents all provide different points of view that are valid to establishing medical necessity. Their description of how the patient functions in various settings and how that can be improved with the desired intervention can not always be provided by a medical professional. While their views should not be submitted alone, they are an excellent complement to a medical opinion.

There is more information to come in the next installment of A medical necessity.

“A Medical Necessity” Part 1

written by James S.

I have been doing some research recently on the positive effects that bicycling can have on children and adults with disabilities. Having watched videos on the subject, read articles and listened to remarks from therapist on Youtube, everything seems to point to one conclusion. Bicycle riding is therapeutic, both mentally and physically for children as well as adults. The  problem is the cost. Most parents and adults wanting to get a recumbent tricycle or a bicycle that is made specifically for persons with disabilities can’t afford them. Carrying price tags ranging from two hundred eighty dollars for a basic tricycle to over five thousand dollars for a tandem cycle. If  a doctor and/or therapist decides that a child or adult needs the bicycle and/or tricycle for physical and emotional therapy, and tells the insurance company that it is medically necessary to help the child/adult with their therapy, then the insurance company should pay for it.  Right?

I began my search for the answer on About.com where Michel Bihari M.D. writes “ Health insurance companies provide coverage only for health-related services that they define or determine to be medically necessary.”
I have posted a link to the ABOUT.COM website Medical Necessity – Definition of Medical Necessity.

The link below is to the Free Online Medical Dictionary along with their definition of “medically necessary” and its criteria.

via medically necessary – definition of medically necessary in the Medical dictionary – by the Free Online Medical Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia..has this definition:
Managed care adjective Referring to a covered service or treatment that is absolutely necessary to protect and enhance the health status of a Pt, and could adversely affect the Pt’s condition if omitted, in accordance with accepted standards of medical practice. See Futility.

a. Appropriate for the Sx and diagnosis or treatment of a condition, illness or injury
b. Provided for the diagnosis or the direct care and treatment of the condition, illness or injury
c. In accordance with the standards of good medical practice in the service area
d. Not primarily for the convenience of a plan member or a plan provider
e. The most appropriate level or type of service or supply which can safely be provided to the plan member.
From the criteria that is listed, a special needs bicycle,tricycle, or recumbent tricycle  seems to meet everything that is required for these to be deemed medically necessary.
This a YouTube video about Freedom concepts bikes. In the video a therapist talks about how bicycling helps children and adults with disabilities.